CCHM Journal Archives
CCHM Video Library

Testimonials

Read More Testimonials

  • “I absolutely loved my time there studying, some of the most enjoyable time of my life. The kindness and generosity extended to everyone has always stuck with me”?

  • I am writing to express my gratitude for being able to attend and take part in your wonderful in class program at CCHM.  The whole process from beginning to end what a long one for me, but the last 3 years of class have flown by. Before choosing a school...
    Read More

  • “The post grad course has been a tremendous experience for me which nourished and enriched what I learnt during my homeopathic training. It is a well-structured and thorough program with great lecturers who were delightful. I also must say that keeping in touch with my former classmates and listening to...
    Read More

  • It's a privilege to be part of CCHM and study the amazing program you offer. I have received a great benefit from my studies, from the comfort of my own home, at my own pace. I have nothing but great things to say about your school and all your staff.

  • You are so fortunate to have  Dr. Kellerstein as faculty; CCHM is a place for quality study of homeopathic medicine and I refer my chiropractic students to your college for advanced study in homeopathy. I am always so excited when I can touch a student in the chiropractic program to look...
    Read More

  • I am writing to express my gratitude for being able to attend and take part in your wonderful in class program at CCHM.  The whole process from beginning to end what a long one for me, but the last 3 years of class have flown by. Before choosing a school...
    Read More

  • The online Teaching Clinic has enhanced my learning curve, raised the bar, challenged my way of thinking as a distance student in a fun and exciting manner. Must say this is an excellent way to hone your skills in preparation to becoming a successful homeopath. Highly recommend and encourage students...
    Read More

  • Thank you for a wonderful weekend. The perspective of case taking that we learned this weekend was exactly what we needed at this stage of our homeopathy training. I will always appreciate and be grateful to you for showing me this path.

  • Hi Kim, my name is Martina and I was one of the post grad students you had this weekend for CCHM. Thank you!! Your teachings in the webinar were fascinating, invaluable, insightful and humbling. I have so much to learn!  --Martina M.

  • Hello, I wanted to say how much I loved Joan Weirs class. After spending the day with her my perspective was changed for the better. We need more Joan Weir through out our 3 year course, especially when trying to keep yourself together during 2nd and 3rd year. Also, today's...
    Read More

Digital Biology and Memory Effect of Water

By: Wynn Free

 

Dr. Jacques Benveniste is a medical doctor who has discovered certain scientific properties of water which defy explanation by the tenets of mainstream physics. His science, which he calls Digital Biology, is based upon two breakthrough observations that he can prove in experiments that have been duplicated by other scientists:

1. If a substance is diluted in water, the water can carry the memory of that substance even after it has been so diluted that none of the molecules of the original substance remain; and

2. The molecules of any given substance have a spectrum of frequencies that can be digitally recorded with a computer, then played back into untreated water (using an electronic transducer), and when this is done, the new water will act as if the actual substance were physically present.

The applications of Digital Biology are endless. Some of them include digital fertilizers and growth enhancers, detection of contaminating organisms in agriculture, digital pharmaceuticals, digital homeopathics, water analysis and purification, and electromagnetic pesticides.

Dr. Benveniste is a French medical doctor and researcher who studied at the Scripps Institute in La Jolla, California, for three years. We spoke with him by phone at his research facility in Paris, France.

Wynn: Could you just briefly state what it is that you have discovered?

Jacques: It's known as the "memory of water." When you add a substance to water and then dilute the water to the point where there are no more molecules of the added substance left in the water, you can still measure effects of the water as if the originally diluted substance were still present.

Wynn: What made you curious enough to start your research?

Jacques: It was an accident. There was a technician in my lab who accidentally diluted more than she thought, and realized that for the amount of molecules that were left there shouldn't be any indication of the original substance. But there was.

We kept diluting, and the action kept coming back. So we knew we had a new phenomenon.

Wynn: That would it mean if I had a giant lake and I poured something into the lake...?

Jacques: No, it doesn't work that way.

First you have to add the substance to the water in a fixed proportion: one to ten, one to a hundred, one to a thousand... So it's a very small amount of information that you bring.

Wynn: Why do you think those specific proportions are meaningful?

Jacques: We don't know. But out of serendipity and experience, we have shown that without those proportions, it doesn't work as well.

Then, between each dilution, you have to agitate violently for 20 seconds to incorporate the little amount of information you put into the test tube.

So for instance you might put one drop of the diluting medium into nine-hundred-ninety-nine drops of water, then agitate for twenty seconds with a violent motion — in what we call a vortex.

Only then do you get the transmission of the information.

You wouldn't be able to shake your lake.

Wynn: A vortex is like a spiral?

Jacques: Exactly, like a funnel inside of the water.

Wynn: How do you determine that the water has the memory of the original substance?

Jacques: You get a specific effect.

Here's an example. Let's say that you apply a histamine to the skin of an animal and it creates an irritation, like a blister. Then if you apply water that has been given the memory of histamine to the skin of the same animal, you will also end up with a blister. That's what I mean by a specific effect.

We added histamine to an isolated guinea-pig heart and found that the effect was the same whether we used a high dilution or the original strength. We did the same with other compounds and got the same result.

We can take this one step further. We can record the activity in the water that has a diluted substance on a computer, and then play the recording to untreated water. And the computer-treated water will have the same effect as the water that was treated with an actual substance and diluted.

Wynn: Let me see if I understood what you just said. Instead of putting the substance in the water, you can put the frequencies of the substance in the water?

Jacques: We don't like to use the word "frequency," because that implies we know what the frequency is. In fact, it's exactly the same thing when you record something on your computer — a song or a voice — and then you replay it. Your ear is vibrating the same way as if the person were in the room. The ear is fooled by the recording. The ear reacts just as if the singer were singing live in the room. You don't know the frequencies involved, you just know that the voice coming out of the speaker exactly emulates how the singer would sound if they were live in the room.

In the same way, you can record the frequency spectrum of a substance.

Wynn: By what interface do you get the spectrum from the treated water into the untreated water?

Jacques: Instead of replaying to a loudspeaker, we use the loudspeaker outlet of the sound card, and plug in a copper coil. The frequency spectrums are always within the audio range of 20 to 20,000 cycles per second.

The point is that we have solved one of the mysteries of classical biology. The phrase "molecular signal" is one of the most used references in biology, except no one has known or asked, "What is the physical nature of the signal?" And we have discovered that at least a good representative signal of the molecule is between 20 and 20,000 Hertz, which makes sense, as only a low frequency can get through water.



 

 

Wynn: How do you record a signal from a substance?

Jacques: Think of a microphone without a membrane, just an electromagnetic coil. You plug that electronic coil into the female receptacle of the sound card. Then you put the molecules in a test tube next to the coil. When those millions of molecules in this liquid vibrate, it's enough for the coil to pick them up.

We are just using commercially available components to measure this.

Wynn: So these experiments sound as though they can be duplicated very easily.

Jacques: Actually, it takes very stringent conditions for the experiment to be repeatable. That's because when you replay to water, the water may or may not take the signal, depending upon local electromagnetic conditions.

For example, now you are recording my voice on tape, and if you put a magnet over the tape, you will erase my voice. But if we were talking face to face, you could put the magnet in front of my mouth and you would still hear my words. So there is a difference between the electromagnetic recording and the real voice, even though they both sound the same.

So the electromagnetic fields in the environment affect whether or not the signal is transferred back to the water.

A lab in Chicago duplicated my experiment where they recorded 26 samples, of which half, or 13, were a control group of random frequencies, and half were actual molecular signals of various substances. Then they sent the untitled computer .wav files to me — so my lab didn't know which was which. But we were able to recognize and identify the 13 real substances, as separate from the control, with a very high significance.

When I published this, no one believed it at first. They thought it was impossible to send molecules over the Atlantic. But they never could point to anything wrong with the experimental protocol.

Wynn: What is it in water that holds the memory?

Jacques: This is the multimillion-dollar question. People will have to rethink the ideas they have on water.

From the get-go, water doesn't behave as it should. There are more than 30 physical constants of water that are "wrong."

For example, water is a mixture of two gases, hydrogen and oxygen, that become liquid at ordinary room temperature. That's totally impossible. Water shouldn't exist.

Why is water liquid? The physicists don't understand this. None of this can really be understood by the common laws of physics. So even though it's inexplicable, all I can do is to repeat my experiments and demonstrate that it works.

Wynn: What's the connection between your discoveries and homeopathy?

Jacques: That has actually become an area of controversy. I am not an alternative practitioner, but a very classical doctor. But I was accused of supporting homeopathy. Regular doctors get very upset when you do something that seems to validate homeopathy.

Yet my experiments do show irrefutably that even when you highly dilute a compound, you can still get activity. So in essence my experiments give a scientific explanation of how homeopathy can work.

It's like a CD. When you break open a CD, the singer is not inside. But you can get the same effect. You don't need the real thing.

Wynn: What are some of the other applications of your discovery?

Jacques: One application is that you can put a detector anywhere in the world and detect any bacteria that are around. You can go to the middle of nowhere in Africa, and if you have a telephone or satellite, in seconds you can send anywhere the signal of the bacteria which are in proximity to the detector. You can then identify the specific bacteria. We do it every day in the lab.

The old way of doing this is to manually collect samples of water and send it to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control), where they will manually analyze the water for traces of bacteria.

Wynn: So if you were working with a very contagious bacterium, you could analyze it without being in direct exposure to it. But couldn't the signal of the bacteria make someone sick?

Jacques: I don't believe so, unless you would put this person inside of a huge coil and send thousands of watts with the signal of the bacteria through the coil. Then if the bacteria generated a toxin in the body, the toxin could be duplicated through the coil. But by diffusing the signal in the air, it would just be too weak.

Wynn: What are some other applications?

Jacques: We think we could detect the AIDS virus at concentrations way below what is commonly measurable. If someone is contaminated with AIDS, there is a period where the antibodies do not appear, yet the person is very contagious. This is a nightmare for blood banks. This could be done very cheaply as compared to DNA analysis.

So far, we are working on a very small budget, so we've haven't been able to develop these protocols yet.

Another application would be killing pests with the field. This would allow pests to be eliminated without contaminating the environment with toxic chemicals.

Wynn: How have you funded your experiments?

Jacques: I am not funded at all. I have created a company with my collaborator called Digi-Bio. We financed our company with small investors, but we are currently looking for larger sponsors so we can develop applications for this technology. There are many other possible applications yet to be discovered and proven.

Right now there are only three people working on this project. But someday I believe there will be thousands of researchers experimenting on this technology, and then the applications will develop fast. But perhaps that will be 30 years from now.

There's nothing described in physics that explains why, when you put two molecules in proximity to each other, there would be any kind of exchange of information except with radioactive substances. The only way that molecules could communicate is by their vibrations. It is known that molecules vibrate. This has been known for 50 years.

So what we are saying is that the vibration is not separate from the molecule. And these vibrations are the way molecules communicate. Digi-Bio is demonstrating the validity of this communication, and this is a significant breakthrough.

Wynn: Thank you very much for taking your time to explain this research to our readers.

Jacques: Thank you for giving me the opportunity.

More Reading